JEWELRY DISPLAY #3: How Sweet It Is…

Candy, that is.  And today’s display idea is a candy dish from a dollar store.

I think this cost me about $6 or $7. I’ve started seeing similar items elsewhere, too, so keep lookout if you think it might work for you.

Here’s what it could look like as jewelry display. (I know, I know, my photography is awful. That’s why I’m a fiber artist, dude!)

Actually this was a real rush set-up, just to give you a way to look at “ordinary items” with an eye for display. What I like about this candy dish thingie is a) it breaks down into parts, so it’s easy to transport; b) it has different levels; and c) it was cheap!

To make it lighter/easier to pack or ship, you could look for baskets to substitute for the dishes.

Utilizing different eye levels in your display is a quick and easy way to add interest and movement.

Bruce Baker, noted speaker on selling and marketing craft, commented on artists and display years ago. He said, “Artists tend to line everything up–paintings, jewerly, pots. It’s so boring!” I thought it was an odd thing to say at the time. Aren’t artists creative?? Don’t we like wild and crazy??

But I started looking at booths and displays more closely, and he’s right. We may be wild/crazy/reckless/ambitious/outre/color-outside-the-lines with our art. But we tend to be very rigid and linear in our display.

Vary the levels a little, set some things off-kilter, work with small groupings and assemblages. See for yourself if it helps generate more interest in your display.

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3 Comments

Filed under art, booth display, craft shows, selling

3 responses to “JEWELRY DISPLAY #3: How Sweet It Is…

  1. Luann,

    Thank you for your blog.

    I use (mostly) metal display racks to feature my glass jewelry. I searched the web for something for my long necklaces , but had no luck. Wow, along came your post(s). Thanks to your link I found Vilmain, and their rack is perfect for me.

    Rio Grande sells compatible displays – but nothing for long necklaces. Thank you again.

  2. Judy Vilmain does good work, and I’m delighted to promote her display stuff. Glad those designs will work for you!

    Be sure when you talk to them they understand you are a CRAFTSPERSON looking for display pieces.

  3. I am selling art photos these days, but this post holds true for me as well. My husband took a few booth shots at the first show where I was marketing my photos (after years of selling stained glass and mosaics) and while I thought I had done an OK job on set-up, when I looked at the booth shots later, I realized that because I had so many images all in the same size (at least they weren’t lined up in rows!!) nothing stood out at all or tempted someone in for a closer look. I’m heading off to a five day show next week and will have a much larger mix of sizes, including some oversize prints on stretched canvas that should be real attention grabbers.
    My suggestion would be to take those booth photos then re-examine them in a few months time and see how they stand up to the more perfect vision of hindsight, then adapt as required for your next set-up.

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