GOOD BOOTHS GONE BAD Addendum

I’ve gone back and put in a photo of my booth from last year’s League of NH Craftsmen’s Fair in the appropriate essays on booth design.

booth photo

No pointing fingers. I’ve already fixed the lights. And I’m already making changes for my smaller retail fairs this winter.

P.S. This is my booth shot for applying to juried shows. That’s why there is no signage that shows my name. Normally you’d see my name plastered all over this booth!

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5 Comments

Filed under art, booth design, booth display, booth floor, booth signs, booth walls, business, craft, craft shows, Good booths gone bad, selling

5 responses to “GOOD BOOTHS GONE BAD Addendum

  1. Hi Luanne,
    I am intrigued by your P.S. and have a compulsive need to know why.
    Why do you have no signage that shows your name for a jury shoot of the booth?
    I am curious as to the logic behind this, please enlighten me & others.
    Thanks,
    Cynthia

  2. That’s a good question, Cynthia.

    The reason is that jurying is supposed to be “about the work” and not about “who the artist is”. So the artist’s name is not revealed to the jury (though your work might still be recognizable.)

    For higher-end shows, in addition to the five images of your work, you’re often also asked for a “booth shot” to ensure your booth is of professional quality–that is, not a table with a plastic tarp draped over it (which I saw at a craft fair last week!)

    I’ve been told that some shows want to make sure you have a tent (for outdoor shows) or are not using a tent for their indoor show…. There may be other reasons for the booth shots, too.

    In order to keep the application images “anonymous”, we are asked to block out anything in the image that shows our name or company name.

    In fact, if you look closely at the banner on the right wall above the display cases, you’ll see my name has been digitally erased by the photographer!

    For first-time exhibitors who don’t have a booth, Bruce Baker suggests making a small model of the booth and photographing that.

  3. Thanks for your reply.

    I appreciate knowing this bit of information as we apply to & have succeeded with some of the better shows here north of the border, but the organizers are not so particular yet as to ask for booth shots without identifying the work.

    Thanks for the idea of deleting signs/names from the booth image as it does preserve the anonimity of the jury process.

    Cheers & look forward to reading you in the TCR too,

    Cynthia

  4. This post is right on time for me, Luann. I’m applying to a “real” show and need a booth shot. Since I don’t have any that are worthy of sending in, I’m going to set it up today and try to take some good photos! I had no idea that I shouldn’t use signage. Thanks for that tip!

  5. I have not a chance to follow all the booth talk but will mostly after the show season is done in one month. I just had a bad experience (I guess second guess the booth) I have always wante my booth to be a U where the customer came into my booth instead of being outside. I do several different jewelry items. Dichroic (mainly) chainmaille and lots of several wire work bracelets. I had my booth set up as usually a U shape allowing customers to walk into. This show was a 177 exhibitors a lot of jewelry as always. I found that many just glanced in or just glanced at say some of the dichroic but missed the rest. If jewelry is selling I do goood but not at this show. Now I am looking at competely changing the entire booth with having a 6′ table across the front with bits of this and that to try to catch as many people as possible. I am really baffled on how to proceed with it and it looks like another all new change with looks and my attitude toward the booth.
    It seems like every show I have to set it up differently. Part of my problem is I have so much stock and try to set it all out. January will be I guess dedicated to changing the booth again.

    I will be interested in all your other booth journals. Thuimbs up for taking the time to share your thoughts on this part of the business.

    Tom

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